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Archaeology - Education

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The TRCA has a strong role to play in informing the public of the importance of cultural resources found in the environment; these include field schools, public archaeology, in-class programs, presentations and artifact displays

TRCA's Archaeology department actively participate in informing the public of the importance of respectful stewardship of the cultural resources found in our environment. A few of the methods we use to educate include an annual Archaeological Field School for high school students, a pilot program for cultural heritage stewards and the public Archaeology Festival at Claremont.  Visit our Programs and Events page to learn more about our upcoming events.

Boyd Archaeological Field School: August 8-24, 2014

  

The Boyd Archaeological Field School is operated by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, under the sponsorship of the York Region District School Board.

Over a two week period, students develop and master interdisciplinary knowledge and skills through the exploration of Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian histories. The course includes lectures and hands-on work at an archaeological site under the instruction of licensed archaeologists. The Boyd Archaeological Field School, recipient of the 2005 Peggy Armstrong Public Archaeology Award, is entering its 37th year of operation with assistance from a number of partners. 

- Local students are STRONGLY encouraged to attend pre-course meeting at the Claremont Field Center on Sunday, June 1 2014. 

 BAFS2013BrochureCoverEarn a credit!

Students will earn a Grade 12 University Prep Credit in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDC4U). This summer course can accommodate a range of abilities and needs.

The course instructors include Ontario teachers, licensed archaeologists, Aboriginal educators and respected professionals in a variety of specialties.

Please visit the Boyd Field School website for the 2014 course brochure and application process, plus more information about the course, photos from previous field seasons, and testimonials.  You can also read more about past excavations by downloading the Boyd Field School 2008 Report.

Bursaries are available! check below

For additional information, Frequently Asked Questions.

For more information or specific questions, please contact Aldo Missio: 905.832.2289 ~ amissio@trca.on.ca

BAFS 2013: We had a very successful 2013 field season! Thank you students and staff for all of your dedicated work! 

Check out the 2012 Daily Dig Diary as well as our photo album on the Boyd Archaeological Field School's Facebook page!

The Durham Region News website published an article after visiting the students of BAFS 2012!  Follow the link to it here!

Boyd Field School students begin the educational excavation at the Sebastien site: 

Situated on Provincial lands in Seaton (north Pickering), the Sebastien site (AlGs-341) was discovered by archaeologists in an agricultural field during the Oak Ridges Moraine/Seaton Class EA process which took place in 2004-05.  The results of the Stage 2 (pedestrian survey and test pitting) and Stage 3 (delineation of site extent) investigations yielded a sample of 2,246 artifacts and determined that the site is about 2.5 hectares (6 acres) in size. Although dating cannot be certain for all recovered artifacts, some have been firmly dated to the Middle Iroquoian period (A.D. 1275-1325).  These artifacts are representative of the ancestral Huron-Wendat people. 

TRCA Archaeology has entered into an agreement with the Province of Ontario to help understand the cultural resources of the Sebastien site, allowing us to conduct detailed archaeological excavations by hand through public and educational programming. As a result, the Boyd Archaeological Field School excavated a small portion of the site for two weeks in August of 2012 with 20 high school students from across Ontario, to gather archaeological data and to facilitate their learning of southern Ontario Aboriginal history and archaeological methods.  Programming is continuing at Sebastien during the 2012-13 school year in partnership with the Durham Catholic District School Board, for students from grades 4-12 to experience local archaeology and gain a better understanding of Durham Region’s past peoples.

ENROLL NOW!

The Carr/Reid Archaeology Bursary for the Boyd Archaeological Field School 

The Carr-Reid Archaeology Bursary has been established to assist students with tuition funding for the Boyd Archaeological Field School. Now in it's third year, the bursary is able to provide 50% tuition support to one deserving student. Deadline for application is Friday May 16 at 5p.m.

Click for more information and to download the application instructions for the Carr Reid Archaeology Bursary for the Boyd Archaeological Field School.

 

Digging For Grades! Partnership with the Durham Catholic District School Board.

In 2012, TRCA Archaeology has begun a new and very successful partnership with the Durham Catholic School Board!  Cathy McDonald, high school history teacher and head of the elementary-level "Gifted Pull-Out Archaeology Program," instructs gifted student from Grades 4-8 in archaeological ethics, research, field techniques and more in a captivating experiential-learning program.  More than 150 students received their hands-on archaeological field experience at the TRCA's Lost Brant excavation for their dig days during the month of May. 

-- Watch a news report on-line with the DCDSB students at the site, courtesy of Rogers Durham! --

These students have directly contributed to Ontario's archaeological record and knowledge of Indigenous lifeways while learning valuable skills relating to teamwork and personal achievement.

* Want an Archaeologist in your classroom, your day camp, historical society or another function?

Contact Janet Batchelor at 416-661-6600 ext 5419 jbatchelor@trca.on.ca

 

Carr Reid Archaeology Bursary:

In 2010, support from our alumni and friends and administrative assistance by The Living City Foundation allowed us to launch a bursary providing 50% of the tuition cost to support one deserving student.  With continued and growing support from our alumni, we are thrilled to be able to offer multiple students the opportunity for a 50% reduction in course tuition through the Carr/Reid Bursary!

Alumni and other friends of the course are asked to please contact Linda Craib (416-661-6600 ext.5207) or Helen Lee (ext.5276) at The Living City Foundation to contribute to this legacy! You can also donate now to the Boyd Archaeological Field School.

Click here for the Carr/Reid Archaeological Bursary Terms of Reference to learn more and apply.

Evaluation is based on the financial need of the student and their passion to explore the discipline of archaeology.

Please be specific in your letter about your desire to take the course and why the bursary is critical for you to be able to attend the Boyd Archaeological Field School.

Frequently Asked Questions:.

Do I need a letter of recommendation from my teacher or just a signature on the application form?

Just the signature, as your teacher acts as a witness to your readiness to take the course from an academic and a social standpoint. Bring along the hard copy of the application form from the course brochure to our pre-course session with the name and signature of the recommending teacher or principal or, if you cannot attend, scan or fax the form c/o Aldo Missio at amissio@trca.on.ca, fax 905-649-1709.

I'm an international student, can I take this course?

Definitely, and many past international students have successfully included the field school in their transcript.

How mandatory is the mandatory pre-course session?

If you live within 3 hours of the Boyd Field School then we consider it reasonable to attend. Otherwise the session will be broadcast over an interactive web conference so that students and parents can participate virtually.

Is the mandatory pre-course session for parents as well, or just students?

Absolutely for parents as well as students. We all need to be comfortable with the living and working arrangements ahead of time. It's also a good opportunity for prospective future year students to sit in and learn more about the course.

How much is tuition?

Tuition for Ontario students is $2195 CDN and $2495 if you're coming from outside of Ontario. This includes all meals, supervised overnight accommodation, professional staff, lab fees, guest experts and a unique educational experience! Course Fee is HST exempt.

When is the tuition deadline?

A $200 (CND) non refundable deposit is required to reserve placement in the course. The remaining balance ($1995 (CND) for Ontario students or $2,295 (CND) for non-Ontario students) is due by May 31st, 2014. Alternate payment plans may be established, e.g. for students who enroll after the pre-course session. The course cancellation policy will be sent to you with the deposit receipt, and is also available at www.boydfieldschool.org

Is the tuition subject to change?

No, the tuition listed is set and will not increase during the current year.

I can't afford the tuition, is there a grant or bursary available?

The Boyd Field School does have a bursary available that is administered through the Living City Foundation! Click here to learn more about the Carr/Reid Archaeology Bursary.

Do you offer a tuition payment plan?

Yes we do! Contact us to talk about it, as our payment plans are on a case by case basis.

What are the accommodations at the field school like?

The rooms range in size from 2 to 5 bunks per room. Rooms are assigned primarily on a first come first serve basis unless two or more students of the same gender know each other ahead of time want to bunk together. Students share washrooms (one for female side of the dorm, one for male side of the dorm) that include curtained shower stalls. We advise the students to bring enough clothes to last them through the 16 days and to bring some laundry soap to wash items if they are desperate. More about the Claremont Field Centre is available at www.boydfieldschool.org

Do I need to buy special "gear" or "wear"?

Some, we provide a list at the pre-course session. But you'll need items such as CSA approved (for construction) foot gear for hiking and working on site, other outdoor shoes, dedicated indoor shoes, field clothes that can and will get dirty (at least one pair of long pants and a long sleeved shirt; the staff love second-hand stores for cargo pants for this purpose!), work gloves, sun hat; and the rest of the items that we all bring are pretty commonsense items like sunscreen, indoor clothes, sleeping bag or blanket, pillow and case, personal items, etc.

Can I bring personal electronic equipment (cell phones, laptops, ipods, etc.)?

Yes, students may bring whatever personal items they choose, although the use of them is restricted in certain specific ways; Cell phones and ipods are to be used during personal time only, not during program time, similar to regular classroom rules.

Laptops can be used for taking notes, drafting assignment answers, surfing the web (since there is wireless internet access at the field centre); However, there are no provisions at the field centre for a group of students to print out assignment answers so we typically expect hand-written assignment answers unless students bring portable printers with their own paper and ink.

I have an established IEP am I able to take this course?

Absolutely! Students with a wide range of IEPs have successfully taken the course and we encourage them to do so since there is so much opportunity for one-on-one instructor/student time and customization of course components to enable all students to excel. We just ask that IEPs and learning/evaluation strategies be discussed with us ahead of time.

I live close by, do I still need to live in the dorm?

Yes. A large part of what makes the Boyd Field School enjoyable is sharing the experience with other students, many strong friendships are forged here, we wouldn't want local students to miss out! Also, your instructors stay at the Field Centre with you, and are available to you outside of formal program times.

What is a typical day at the field school like?

The day starts at 7am with breakfast at 7:30, students either travel to the site for fieldwork or stay at the field school for instructional activities or experimental archaeology projects. Everyone shares 3 meals per day together in the dining hall with the archaeology program continuing after supper.

From 6pm or 6:30 until 8:30 or 9pm we have evening program which could be an experimental archaeology activity, a guest speaker/expert, lab time with the artifacts, etc., then snack at 9pm (with announcements, assignments being handed in or being returned, etc) and then assignment time and/or free time from 9:15 to 10:30. To the dorms at 10:30 and lights out at 11.

It's a routine students get used to quickly and it helps to maximize our academic/class/instruction time (since you need over 120 hours in the 16 days to get the credit) and enables quite a bit of one-on-one time if needed between the students and the instructors during assignment/homework time.

 

here:

Carr Reid Archaeology Bursary:

In 2010, support from our alumni and friends and administrative assistance by The Living City Foundation allowed us to launch a bursary providing 50% of the tuition cost to support one deserving student.  With continued and growing support from our alumni, we are thrilled to be able to offer multiple students the opportunity for a 50% reduction in course tuition through the Carr/Reid Bursary!

Alumni and other friends of the course are asked to please contact Linda Craib (416-661-6600 ext.5207) or Helen Lee (ext.5276) at The Living City Foundation to contribute to this legacy! You can also donate now to the Boyd Archaeological Field School.

Click here to download the Carr Reid Archaeology Bursary 2013  to learn more and apply.

Evaluation is based on the financial need of the student and their passion to explore the discipline of archaeology.

Please be specific in your letter about your desire to take the course and why the bursary is critical for you to be able to attend the Boyd Archaeological Field School.